Swimming with Sharks: How Raising Wild Fared After the Tank

When two sisters struggled to find suitable swimwear after giving birth, they decided to design some themselves. Later the founders went into the Shark Tank hoping to secure a deal to expand their business, Raising Wild.

But did they manage to attract any Sharks? And what happened to Raising Wild after appearing on Shark Tank?

What is Raising Wild?

Raising Wild is a Florida-based company that makes swimwear for women and kids. In 2016, the two sister founders went to the Sharks seeking $100k for a 20% stake in their business.

Who is Raising Wild swimwear for?

Raising Wild’s main market is moms, but they also cater to women of all body types. In essence, the company serves women who find it difficult to find a comfortable bathing suit. Additionally, using durable fabric for the suits helps moms save money in the long term.

The company also makes swimwear for kids, making it easy for moms to shop for the family’s swimwear in one place. Raising Wild has narrowed its target customers and makes all-around swimsuits that offer a perfect fit, style, and function.

Raising Wild founders on Shark Tank

What’s so special about Raising Wild swimwear?

Raising Wild swimwear is designed to provide women with swimsuits that are stylish, comfortable, and functional. As the co-founders are mothers themselves, they perfectly understand the need to have a bathing suit that is flattering and functional, especially following the bodily changes that come with childbirth.

Raising Wild swimwear is unique, elegant, and beautiful, and has features like adjustable ties, full bum coverage, built-in shelf bras, and nursing-friendly designs to cater to their target market. Its mission is for women to feel confident and comfortable every time they step on the beach.

The company also has a kids’ swimwear line to provide kids with quality swimsuits. Raising Wild focuses on using quality material, so the items are durables as kids run wild on beaches.

Raising Wild swimwear for kids

How do customers rate Raising Wild?

Although some Shark Tank viewers were originally disappointed that the swimsuits were more expensive than the competition, social media feedback shows that their customers appreciate Raising Wild’s swimwear. 

Moms claim the swimwear makes them feel confident enough to swim and have fun on the beach. Some even come out to defend the company’s pricing of the swimwear. As one customer put it:

“YES YES YES YES YES! I’m telling you, there is nothing better than having a blast in a suit that makes you crazy comfortable in your own skin! I’m hook, line, and sinker for your company! Woohooo, let summer last forever! #swimwearyoucanlivein

Raising Wild’s swimwear for women costs on average $138, while that for kids costs $48–$52. The swimwear comes in various designs and colors and is available on their website.

In an interview, Kara and Shelly have also stated that although ensuring the high quality of materials results in higher prices, they are still looking for ways to bring down the prices.

Raising Wild swimwear
Pros:
  • The swimwear is made of quality fabric
  • The designs of the swimsuits have comfortable fits
  • The swimsuits are practical even for nursing mothers
Cons:
  • A bit on the pricey side
We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.

Who owns Raising Wild?

Raising Wild founders Shelly Hyde and Kara Haught

Two sisters, Rachelle (Shelly) Hyde and Kara Haught, co-founded Raising Wild. Kara now lives in Utah but Shelly still lives in Florida, where their extended family lives. They originally invested $2,000 to get the company off the ground.

Growing up, they had worn swimsuits almost all year long. As they transitioned into motherhood, finding appropriate and flattering choices became more challenging. This inspired them to create the Raising Wild swimsuit line to help women of all body types.

Shelly and Kara watched their mother sew clothes as they grew up. So, making swimwear when they couldn’t find any comfortable options didn’t feel like a far-fetched idea. Plus their motherhood experiences gave them the drive and tenacity to run the business and grow it to great heights.

When did Raising Wild go on Shark Tank?

Raising Wild appeared on Season 8, Episode 3 of Shark Tank. It first aired on October 7, 2016.

Did Raising Wild get a deal on Shark Tank?

Yes, Raising Wild successfully got a deal on Shark Tank. After initially struggling to convince the Sharks to back them, eventually Barbara Corcoran agreed to invest $100,000 for a 50% stake in the company, valuing Raising Wild at $200,000.

Shelly Hyde and Kara Haught went in seeking $100,000 for a 20% stake in their bathing suits business, which gave the company a valuation of $500,000. The two entrepreneur moms claimed they had made lifetime sales of $130,000 using social media for marketing. They sold the swimsuits for between $130 and $160, with each piece costing $38 to produce.

The other Sharks left the deal because they felt the swimsuit market was saturated and Raising Wild lacked concrete expansion plans. But the founders found their lifeline when one of them told the story of helping her 10-year-old child thrive in school despite having ADHD—a heart-wrenching story that reeled Barbara Corcoran in.

Barbara initially offered $100k for a 51% stake on the condition they lowered the price of the Raising Wild bathing suits to under $100 to compete favorably in the market. The two women countered with a 35% stake, and they all settled for the Shark getting a 50% stake.

How is Raising Wild doing after Shark Tank?

In the first year after their Shark Tank episode aired, Raising Wild made sales of $400,000. The company followed Barbara Corcoran’s advice and named the different bathing suits after their sisters while also lowering the prices. Raising Wild has also entered the kids’ swimwear and women’s apparel market.

Is Raising Wild still in business?

Yes, Raising Wild is still in business as of today. Shelly and Kara are still dedicated to their mission to provide mothers with a functional and glamorous swimsuit. In addition to creating a new line of swimwear after Shark Tank, they have also recently added eyewear and sandals in their product catalog.

What is Raising Wild’s net worth today?

At the time Raising Wild appeared on Shark Tank, the company’s value was $200,000. Since that time, the company’s sales have rocketed, with over $30 million worth of products sold. It’s safe to say that if part or all of the company were to be sold today, the price will be many times higher than its original valuation.

Is Raising Wild Successful?

Yes, Raising Wild is successful. As well as registering $30 million+ in lifetime sales, the swimwear company boasts significant followings on Facebook and Instagram. Raising Wild now sources materials and labor for their bathing suits from Los Angeles.

Is Barbara Corcoran still with Raising Wild?

Barbara Corcoran continues to partner with Raising Wild to this day. In fact, Raising Wild has appeared in the investor’s list of her favorite Shark Tank investments of all time.

Barbara has also been very influential on the business. For example, it was her idea to name swimsuits after the founders’ sisters, daughters, and nieces. Shelly and Kara have also acknowledged that a major lesson from Barbara is learning how to prioritize. 

Shelly Hyde was quoted saying that during sessions with her, Barbara will often tell them, “Girls, you’ve got great ideas but we’ve got to get back to A.” 

Raising Wild swimwear
Pros:
  • The swimwear is made of quality fabric
  • The designs of the swimsuits have comfortable fits
  • The swimsuits are practical even for nursing mothers
Cons:
  • A bit on the pricey side
We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.
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AUTHOR

Ben Flynn is your neighborhood-friendly product reviewer, with experience dating from 2017, when he joined the world of freelancing as a copywriter. He is competent across multiple fields and adept at detailed research. Ben has also watched nearly every episode Shark Tank and has developed a good sense of critique, which comes out distinctly in his writing.